The Butterfly Effect

In 1961 MIT meteorologist Edward Lorenz began contributing to a branch of mathematics known as chaos theory in an attempt to predict weather patterns. Chaos theory is the study of systems in which small changes to initial conditions, yield large differences in outcomes. Consider releasing a bowling ball down a lane. A wide variety of outcomes are dependent on slight differences in the ball's initial position, speed, and spin (among other things). Lorenz coined the phrase “the butterfly effect” to describe his work on chaos theory. He suggested that the flapping of a butterfly's wings might precipitate a hurricane on the far side of the world. That is, a small change to the existing meteorological conditions might have a large effect on the state of the weather system.

The theme for this year's print exchange is the butterfly effect. Please consider how you interpret chaos theory, pattern, order, mathematics, predictability, or butterfly effect.

Traveling Exhibition Set to be Exhibited at:

Arizona State University. Tempe, Arizona

St. Lawrence University. Canton, New York

University of Wisconsin-Stout. Menomonie, Wisconsin

Special Collections:

California College of the Arts, Hamaguchi Study Print Collection, Meyer Library. Oakland, California

Wichita State University School of Art, Design and Creative Industries, Print Media Collection. Wichita, Kansas

Curated and organized by Fawn Atencio.




Route 66, Westbound to Paradise

Route 66, also known as the road to opportunity, linked Chicago to Los Angeles between 1926 and the mid 1950's. The road functions as a metaphorical bridge, connecting the country socially and culturally, bringing people to paradisaical California. The road enabled over 200,000 people to migrate to California, escaping the Dust Bowl. After World War II, thousands of soldiers and sailors sought the perfect climate and plentiful jobs on the West Coast. Once again Route 66 facilitated their relocation. As people migrated along the route, it served as a cultural conduit, transporting ideas, progressive thinking, and diversity westward. The road to opportunity led to California, a place for a better life and where paradise could be found.

In keeping with the conference theme of Print MKE, I wanted to broaden the print community's social network by creating a portfolio exchange in which I invite 10 printmakers who each invite one additional artist. By encouraging participants to invite an additional person, all participants extend their collaborative community and their exposure to unfamiliar, uncommon places, people, and ways in which artists make prints and exchange information. This extends the size of the network while shortening the average path length between makers of prints.

A portfolio will be given to each artist, remaining sets will go to the following conference, collections and will exhibit at the following:

Mid America Print Council Conference Themed Portfolios for PRINTCITY Detroit, Michigan Fall 2014

Arizona State University. Tempe, Arizona.

California State University, Northridge. Northridge, California

Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, Missouri

Plymouth State University, Plymouth, New Hampshire

The University of Central Oklahoma. Edmond, Oklahoma

The University of Texas at El Paso. El Paso, Texas

Tyler School of Art, Temple University. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Special Collections, California State University, Northridge. Northridge, California

Curated and organized by Fawn Atencio.




The Average Path Length

Small world experiments designed by Stanley Milgram and other researchers in the 1960's examined the size and connectedness of social networks of people in the United States. The research was revolutionary; it offered that human relationships can be represented as paths connecting nodes (individuals). The distance between individuals can be measured by the number of paths (or relationships) they are from one another. Thus we have the idea of six degrees of separation; the average path length between any two people in the world is six relationships from each other.

In keeping with the conference theme of Print MKE, I wanted to broaden the print community's social network by creating a portfolio exchange in which I invite 10 printmakers who each invite one additional artist. By encouraging participants to invite an additional person, all participants extend their collaborative community and their exposure to unfamiliar, uncommon places, people, and ways in which artists make prints and exchange information. This extends the size of the network while shortening the average path length between makers of prints.

A portfolio will be given to each artist and remaining sets will go to the following conference and collections:

Southern Graphics Council International Conference, Print MKE 2013 Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. Milwaukee, Wisconsin & Peck School of the Arts, Univeristy of Wisconsin. Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Southern Graphics Council International Archives, Knoxville, Tennessee

Special Collections, Plymouth State University, Plymouth, New Hampshire

Exhibition / Travel Set

Curated and organized by Fawn Atencio.